Breathing Renewed Life into Our Work: Nurturing the Seedlings

Author: Ericka Harris, Training Associate and member of the Thinking Collaborative Futures Team

As plants need sunshine and water to nurture their growth and development, we also crave the sun, turning our faces towards its warmth and glow, quenching our thirst with the cool water that flows freely from our streams. Use these quotations to warm your spirit, inspiring personal and professional growth.

This month, let’s focus on renewing our commitment, passion, and energy for this work. There will be four opportunities for you to ponder quotations.

• You will need your journal to take notes, reflect on the short passages, and to write “Look Fors” to support your continued blooming.
• Please commit to spending ten minutes a day to recharge and reflect.
• Consider these prompts to ignite the power within:
a. What do you see in the quotation that supports your role?
b. What does the quotation make you think about/remember?
c. About what does the quotation make you wonder?

DAY FOUR
“Listening for potential is a choice in every moment. By choosing to listen to people as successful, competent, and able to resolve their own dilemmas, guess what’s likely to happen? They often solve their own problems and get on with the job.”
David Rock, Quiet Leadership

DAY FIVE
“There is no greater gift you can give or receive than to honor your calling. It’s why you were born, and how you become most truly alive.”
Oprah Winfrey, The Path Made Clear

DAY SIX:
“Other leaders used their intelligence in a fundamentally different way. They applied their intelligence to amplify the smarts and capability of people around them. People got smarter and better in their presence. Ideas grew; challenges were surmounted; hard problems were solved. When these leaders walked into a room, light bulbs started going off over people’s heads. Ideas flew so fast that you had to replay the meeting in slow motion just to see what was going on. Meetings with them were idea mash-up sessions. These leaders seemed to make everyone around them better and more capable. These leaders weren’t just intelligent themselves—they were intelligence multipliers.”
Liz Wiseman and Greg McKeown, Multipliers